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mathematically perfected economy™ (MPE™)    1  :   the singular integral solution of  1) inflation and deflation,  2) systemic manipulation of the cost or value of money or property, and  3) inherent, artificial multiplication of debt into terminal systemic failure;    2  :  every prospective debtor's right to issue legitimate promises to pay, free of extrinsic manipulation, adulteration, or exploitation of those promises, or the natural opportunity to make good on them;    3  :  our right to certify, to enforce, and to monetize industry and commerce by this one sustaining and truly economic process.

MORPHALLAXIS, January 14, 1979.

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 Post subject: Few In Controle of World's Stocks Physics Discovers
PostPosted: 28 Aug 2009, 3:02 am 
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Joined: 29 Jan 2008, 6:06 pm
Posts: 731
Stay tune: The results will be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review.

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Dr. Stefano Battiston; Systemgestaltung F 27.2; Kreuzplatz 5; 8032 Zürich SWITZERLAND
Phone: +41 44 632 84 64/Fax: +41 44 632 18 80/E-Mail: sbattiston@ethz.ch
Research Interests

Systemic Risk in Financial Networks
Cascades of bankruptcy and propagation of financial distress
Evolution and Structure of Economic Networks
Ownerships, Boards of Directors, Production, Supply, Credit
Beyond On-line Social Networks
Collective Evaluation, Trust, Recommender Systems

Vision

I believe that the combination of models and empirical studies in economic and social networks will lead to major changes in the way we conceive economic interactions and sustainable development.

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James B. Glattfelder; ETH Zürich; Systemgestaltung KPL F 29.2; Kreuzplatz 5; 8032 Zurich, SWITZERLAND
Phone: +41 44 632 82 46/ Fax: +41 44 632 18 80/ E-Mail: jglattfelder@ethz.ch

Lauren Schenkman wrote:

WASHINGTON -- A recent analysis of the 2007 financial markets of 48 countries has revealed that the world's finances are in the hands of just a few mutual funds, banks, and corporations. This is the first clear picture of the global concentration of financial power, and point out the worldwide financial system's vulnerability as it stood on the brink of the current economic crisis.



A pair of physicists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich did a physics-based analysis of the world economy as it looked in early 2007. Stefano Battiston and James Glattfelder extracted the information from the tangled yarn that links 24,877 stocks and 106,141 shareholding entities in 48 countries, revealing what they called the "backbone" of each country's financial market. These backbones represented the owners of 80 percent of a country's market capital, yet consisted of remarkably few shareholders.



"You start off with these huge national networks that are really big, quite dense," Glattfelder said. “From that you're able to ... unveil the important structure in this original big network. You then realize most of the network isn't at all important."



The most pared-down backbones exist in Anglo-Saxon countries, including the U.S., Australia, and the U.K. Paradoxically; these same countries are considered by economists to have the most widely-held stocks in the world, with ownership of companies tending to be spread out among many investors. But while each American company may link to many owners, Glattfelder and Battiston's analysis found that the owners varied little from stock to stock, meaning that comparatively few hands are holding the reins of the entire market.



“If you would look at this locally, it's always distributed,” Glattfelder said. “If you then look at who is at the end of these links, you find that it's the same guys, [which] is not something you'd expect from the local view.”



Matthew Jackson, an economist from Stanford University in Calif. who studies social and economic networks, said that Glattfelder and Battiston's approach could be used to answer more pointed questions about corporate control and how companies interact.



"It's clear, looking at financial contagion and recent crises, that understanding interrelations between companies and holdings is very important in the future,” he said. "Certainly people have some understanding of how large some of these financial institutions in the world are, there's some feeling of how intertwined they are, but there's a big difference between having an impression and actually having ... more explicit numbers to put behind it."



Based on their analysis, Glattfelder and Battiston identified the ten investment entities who are “big fish” in the most countries. The biggest fish was the Capital Group Companies, with major stakes in 36 of the 48 countries studied. In identifying these major players, the physicists accounted for secondary ownership -- owning stock in companies who then owned stock in another company -- in an attempt to quantify the potential control a given agent might have in a market.



The results raise questions of where and when a company could choose to exert this influence, but Glattfelder and Battiston are reluctant to speculate.



"In this kind of science, complex systems, you're not aiming at making predictions [like] ... where the tennis ball will be at given place in given time," Battiston said. “What you're trying to estimate is ... the potential influence that [an investor] has."

Glattfelder added that the internationalism of these powerful companies makes it difficult to gauge their economic influence. "[With] new company structures which are so big and spanning the globe, it's hard to see what they're up to and what they're doing,” he said. Large, sparse networks dominated by a few major companies could also be more vulnerable, he said. "In network speak, if those nodes fail, that has a big effect on the network."

Source:http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14934
Source:http://blogs.usatoday.com/sciencefair/2009/08/tiny-group-of-stockholders-control-most-markets.html
Source:http://www.insidescience.org/research/study_says_world_s_stocks_controlled_by_select_few




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While 12,000 homes a day continue to go into foreclosure, mathematically perfected economy™ would re-finance a $100,000 home with a hundred-year lifespan at the overall rate of $1,000 per year or $83.33 per month. Without costing us anything, we would immediately become as much as 12 times as liquid on present revenue. Transitioning to MPE™ would apply all payments already made against existent debt toward principal. Many of us would be debt free. There would be no housing crisis, no credit crisis. Unlimited funding would immediately be available to sustain all the industry we are capable of.

There is no other solution. Regulation can only temper an inherently terminal process.

If you are not promoting mathematically perfected economy™, then you condemn us to monetary failure.



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